Thursday, August 06, 2015

Hey You! How we gonna tame you down? Part I

Maryam Z | 9:43 AM | | | | | |
Hey You! 
How we gonna tame you down? Part I  

“You're wild. Wild, I say! You're everywhere. 
You’re all over the place. No order at all. None. 
Okay, maybe there’s some structure somewhere. 
But I don't think so. 
You’re just wild and outta control!” 

Whose voice is that speaking up so boldly? 
Is that you going all judgmental about your friend's child? 
Is it your parents discussing their grandchild's behavior the minute you'd waved that last goodbye? 

Ah, more likely, it's that senior back there in the store, the one whose stare stung you. If only, if only your toddler had held onto all that drama till the two of you had made your escape. 
 No. This voice is none of the above. This bold voice 
brash though timid, 
noisy though silent, 
experienced though inexperienced 
is the voice of curiosity, the voice of every infant 
and nonverbal toddler before their oral language development allows them the words 
to make known all those fundamentally urgent queries. 

Okay, you're thinking. If not me nor my screaming child, who is it who’s been cast in that "wild and outta control" role? For the lowdown on this uniquely wild cast of characters, let's hear more from your own little casting director.


What can they be, all these 
wild things? They are so outta control! 
And there are so many of them. I can’t tell 
you how many cause I can't count yet. 
‘Sides, there are way too many to count. 
And they keep moving. And changing. 
I'll never figure it all out. 

Hmm? What's my baby trying to tell me? What’s she mean by things? And how are they wild and outta control? I don’t get it. What’s all that about how they keep moving? And changing?

To get it, let's listen in to more thoughts of any baby during any waking moment of any busy day of daily living. It's a wise little voice we hear, one who's asking for foundational guidance in the development of oral language skills... and help in learning knowledge about the world, the two pre-requisites for success in reading, writing, and all learning. This little voice needs us to hear more thoughts...

Here's how I see it. If someone would tell me what they are, then I'd know how to tell you all about what I know. What I mean is what are all these things I see everywhere? Do they go with sounds? Sounds like... me? I mean, everyone looks at me and says the same sounds every time. 

So when I hear those sounds, I pay attention. Yeah! I'm beginning to think those sounds mean ME. And if those sounds go with ME, then are there sounds that go with all those things out there? Those things that are everywhere? Those things that keep moving and changing? You see what I mean? You see why I think they're... outta control? 

Yes, Baby begins to get the idea that particular sounds carry meaning. After all, you and everyone are forever saying your new baby's name. And soon, she pays rapt attention, though, in truth, she has no clue it's her name. She's only responding because she hears sounds repeated.

She has also noticed that those repeated sounds are accompanied by a smiling face, one that comes very close to her own and looks right at her. Research and experience have long told us that babies love faces.*

Indeed, she likes the face and the sounds. Now, let's return to the carefully-planned script Baby wants us to hear... to hear what and how Baby would like us to give structure to all those things.

I'll be happy when they notice that I want to know what to call things. For example, they're always saying sounds like "doggie" for one of those things I see. 

They sometimes say those "doggie" sounds when I don't see that thing. But I hear something. And they say those "doggie" sounds when I see things that are sorta-same-but-sorta-different-looking things. 

My point is, I pay attention when I hear "doggie" sounds cause when I pay attention, they smile and say those sounds again. Oh, I really like that! I hope they’ll make more sounds soon! Bring ‘em on. I"m ready! 

If not before, we now know more about how preverbal babies and toddlers view their environment. We know they"re needing to make sense of a massive jungle of jumbled things. And bringing on more sounds is where it all begins. I like to call this process one of "Taming by Naming" –giving names, or nouns, to all those things that babies see.


We've noticed that Baby's first words are usually nouns. That’s because nouns are the first words we model for them. We name Baby and ourselves, and then we proceed to name things: kitty, bottle, pacifier, blankie, bed, swing, high chair, first solid foods, and the like. As Baby grows, so grows our list of nouns.


Playing the age-old game of "I Spy" invites you to use nouns to point out and name objects for your baby. In this "Taming-by-Naming" game,you’ll do all the work until Baby can point to objects you'll name. Be sure to point first to your eye as you say, "I spy with my little eye [pause] a [name and point to an object you see]." Begin with a few familiar spied objects and repeat their nouns often. Your younger or less language-experienced child will appreciate your adding new nouns slowly.

Let's stop for now and let your own list of nouns and their sounds begin. Then come back

In the interim, send me a comment here below. And check out my book titled Little Books of Nouns at http://www.babsyb.com/collections/books/products/little-book-of-nouns


This book contains all sorts of ideas and activities,along with words you can substitute in with a familiar tune to sing about the three kinds of nouns and all that they do.

Nouns for your baby? You bet! Beginning such songs with your infant develops familiarity with language and knowledge that’s useful for life.

The Nouns book also contains 14 little rhyming books about nouns. You can add these 14 books to your home library and use them with your child in differing ways for many years to come.

Without a doubt, your little casting director has presented a fun and interactive script for you, your child’s first best teacher.

Enjoy building your child’s storehouse of knowledge while you're developing oral language experiences. And all the while, you're taming that wild world of things for your baby, one noun at-a-time.

Also save 10% on your Babsy B order by using the coupon code: blog @ checkout.
~ Babsy B 

See more from Babsy B at:
Website: babsyb.com
Blog: ilikeme.com
Facebook: facebook.com/Babsybreads
Pinterest: pinterest.com/babsybproducts
Twitter: @Babsybbooks
Youtube: youtube.com/user/babsybproducts
TeachersPayTeachers.com: teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Bee-With-Babsy-B


Taming-by-Naming is a trademark of Babs Bell Hajdusiewicz. 
Here at elitemamablog.com this time next month for more tips in my “Hey you! How we gonna tame you down? Part II” where we’ll explore more Taming-by-Naming games you can play, along with more reasons to play such games every day with your baby, toddler, or your nonverbal or ELL child of any age.


Copyright © 2015 Babs Bell Hajdusiewicz
FacetoFace: A Book to Read to Your Baby © 1989 Joseph F.
Fagan & Babs Bell Hajdusiewicz


37 comments:

  1. Hi elitemamablog.com Readers!

    I'm honored to be invited by Maryam to join all of you with a guest post each month. Do let us know your thoughts about this post...Did the topic interest you? Is this post of help to you in your parenting, grandparenting, or general kid-caring role? What are your ideas for topics down the road? What would you like help with around children and books, literacy, school, or all-things-kids? What topics would you just like to read more about? Thanks for reading and commenting!
    ~Babs

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  2. Love your approach of trying to view life through your little one's lens. Such a good reminder that they have so much information, so much "jumble" to process and most of the time they are simply just trying to make sense of it all. I think teaching them nouns is a great place to start to help develop their oral language. Thanks for an informative read, and look forward to seeing more! ~E.G.

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    1. Hi E.G. Thank you for reading and for your comment. Yes, babes have this whole big wide world to learn about and the 600K+ words in the English language. Then, if there's a second (or third or more) language in the home, we must add one or more additional mass of words that our wee ones are privileged to get to own. Wow, what a "jumble to process," as you so well put it.

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  3. I really like the way that this post discusses how children can learn words and to use the eyes and look at noun word and say it to baby. Babies need to learn all these noun words because it helps them speak well when they start talking. I think teaching babies all these words using nouns is such a terrific idea!!

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  4. Hi Julie. Thanks for joining our discussion. Yes, the richer the language babies hear, the more powerful speakers they can be. And powerful speakers become powerful readers and writers. Whatever words they hear, they will say! For nearly 5 decades now, I've used WOW! Words (any word that causes the listener to pay positive attention to your child, saying WOW!) to build children's powerful speaking vocabularies. It's all about talking.

    Check out my WOW! Word provided each and every week for your child ages 0-3+ at http://www.ilikeme.com/wow-word-of-the-week-attempt-2/#more-2415. There on my blog, you'll find sample sentences you can say to use each week's new word as you continue to use previously-introduced words. And for your child aged 4-7, see my WOW! Words book with tons of activities and a poem for every week to help you and your child or your child's whole classroom build powerful conversation around a powerful WOW! Word...all at http://www.babsyb.com/collections/books/products/wow-words. Talking costs nothing! Wow! Enjoy!

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  5. interesting,ill admit for a few i was totallyconfused,,but now i get it

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    1. Hi Vicke! Thanks for your comment and for staying tuned to "get it." That's so like our wee ones and how they look at us with those puzzled faces as they are trying to sort it all out, this whatever we are saying or doing. They, too, must stay tuned to figure us out! LOL

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  6. This was a very interesting post. Our granddaughter is almost 18 months old and seems to say a new word almost every day. It is amazing how little ones learn!

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    1. Hello Connie. Thanks for reading and sharing. Enjoy that explosion of language with your GrandGem!

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  7. I haven't been around babies for a long time, but my Nephew and his girlfriend are expecting their first child and I bet they would love this.

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    1. Hello Holly. Thanks for sharing with family members. Yes, they have much to anticipate. This language journey is an excursion of joy with a www one.

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  8. What a great idea to calm Moms and Kidlets.Will hunt this down for my daughter and grand daughter

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    1. Let us know how we can be of help in your hunt, Tricia. Thanks for reading. Here's to peaceful self soothing language! Thanks for reading and sharing with your daughter and GrandGem.

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  9. Interesting post. Sometimes we really don't think about things this way. The Little book of Nouns sounds like a good one to have.

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    1. Hi Shelly! You're right it's a different perspective when we jump into a baby's shoes to view this world. Thanks for the read and your comment.

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    1. Hi Birdie Bee! We at Babsy B appreciate your read and comment. I'll be in my own Babyland and Toddler Two-land shortly with GrandGems. More perspective-fodder In store for me! Hoping to hear from you readers here the specific topics that interest you. I'm filled with ideas and am looking to tailor them to interests/concerns from all of you. One parent's concern around biting, for example not only stimulated a four-part blog post on biting, it also brought on some poetic words to say and sing to wee ones to help prevent biting and other hurtful behaviors. See "Ask Babs" this week at babsyb.com and ilikeme.com.

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  11. As a new parent myself, this post really gives me a better understanding of how young children learn words. Very unique perspective!

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  12. Congratulations, Natalie! And thank you for giving me one more reason to get to keep doing what I love doing--writing for babies and onward and for their parents and teachers. i so enjoy getting to be your partner on this, your baby's journey toward becoming the best reader, writer, and lifelong learner possible. Thank you for your comment. Please keep me posted re how I can be of more help to the two of you!

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  13. Good, informative post for parents! I am a parent of a low-verbal child with autism, so even at age 9 he continues to learn new words to add to his vocabulary, it just takes a lot more time than for a typical child. Each new word he learns is so special. Glad to see books like these are also directed at special needs children :)

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    1. Hi Krista. Thanks for sharing your personal experience with oral language development...to allow us to celebrate those milestones with him and you! Indeed, every new word is a special new gem for your child. Don't we love the moment that lightbulb goes on in the child's mind and a word or phrase comes forth on their tongue! Cause for great celebration! Having taught students of all ages, abilities, and capabilities from infancy through the intermediate grades (grades 3–5), I have children's diverse needs in mind as I write. This has made my life's work ever more challenging...and fun! You will find of interest for your son several of my books, including my "WOW! Words" book at babsyb.com/collections/books and new WOW! Word each week on my blog at ilikeme.com. Happy word acquisitions! I'm an email away if I can be of any assistance.

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  14. i think it sounds great . I would've liked this when my LO was younger

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    1. Hi Sarah. I was here doing this work whenever your LO was younger...just not here-here! Thank you for the read and for your comment.

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  15. I really liked this....we have 3 grandchildren under the age of 15 months, so the books would be a hit at our house.

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    1. Hi Katherine. Glad you found the post of interest and helpful with your Grands. Congratulations on being thrice blessed! I'm with my two GrandGems now. This Granding is tastier than any hot fudge sundae, eh?! Go to my site at http://www.babsyb.com/collections/babsy-b-board-books-series-1 for books for those infants and toddlers you have...and to www.babsyb.com/collections/books to view others of my titles. Parents and teachers like my poems posters at http://www.babsyb.com/collections/frontpage. Then there's my blog at www.ilikeme.com. As I've written to others in comments, I've been around doing this work with children, parents, and teachers for decades, so there are lots of resources available. Great for holiday gifts.

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  16. Great post. I am all for the nouns for baby as the earlier the better as children pick things up so quickly.

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    1. Thanks, Birdie Bee! Glad you're finding this post to be a good read. Yes, babies do learn quickly. It's a minute-by-minute challenge to keep ahead of them...or just to keep up! I'm with my two GrandGems now, and the 28 mos. teaches me new things every minute. Yesterday she helped this Grandmama who was actually lost during our return walk to her home! Amazing. Have been modeling for her the figurative phrase "pulling my leg" which she's processing into her keen sense of humor. Fun to watch it percolate! And her baby bro at 4 mos. is face-studying to grab up every naming noun each of us tosses out to him. Delightful to converse with this verbose little guy who seems to think his voice is the only voice to be heard and that I'm the one learning as he's teaching me a new language! So much fun!

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  17. Sounds great! Would be nice to have for my grand baby.

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    1. Hi Sandra. Thanks for your comment. Congratulations to you! Grandbabies are THE best! I'm holding one of mine now, in fact. Visit me at www.babsyb.com/collections and let us know how we can be of help and support to you in your child's and your journeys as your grandbaby's first best teachers.

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  18. Think it is really great! This is really nice read

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  19. Glad you found the post interesting and applicable, sandyhills. Thanks for your comment.

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  20. I think this is really great! When my son was little, we attended a few parenting courses at our local college to help us understand him during his speech issues. We learned to just sit and watch him play, discovering how he expressed his varied emotions. It really helped us gain an understanding of when a few melt downs were about to occur and defuse.

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    1. Hi Betsy. As you say, it's helpful to take the time and energy to understand how and what our preverbal children are feeling and needing. Most grateful to you that you were motivated to learn more about those feelings and needs in support of both your child and yourselves during your son's stage of needing time and patience from his adults. Tune in this month for Part 2 on this topic. I hope you will share both posts with friends and family members who are parenting babies or preverbal children. Thank you for reading and sharing your experiences, Betsy.

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  21. This is a great book. And teaches the kids about nouns. Thanks for sharing this.

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    1. Denise, glad the Nouns book is of interest! Thanks for your comment.

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  22. I thought that Babsy B was writing a good dialog. I would recommend this to all readers.

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    1. Thanks, Jerry. Glad you found the post of interest. Watch for my new post to come this week here at elitemamablog.com.

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